/ Culture

The Myth of American Racism

Two dozen skinheads turn out for a rally in rural Georgia, and the New York Times suddenly takes an interest in what goes on in the Bible Belt — if only to spite its denizens. Jacey Fortin writes:

A neo-Nazi rally outside of Atlanta on Saturday drew only a few participants and did not last very long.

But the event still upended Newnan, Ga., a city of about 38,000, for an afternoon as downtown shops closed and counter-protesters gathered. Hasco Craver, the assistant city manager, said more than 700 law enforcement officers were present from 42 agencies.

Were the 700 officers there to protect the 100 counter-protesters and Antifa from the two dozen skinheads? The event didn’t last long and few people showed up, but the media wants Americans to believe that this is proof of a thriving white supremacist movement, resurgent ever since President Trump took office. Why?

Because white supremacy and Nazism are political nonfactors in America today, but reports about the ongoing but not really expanding activities of these few losers, fuel the impression that mass media seeks to create of a resurgent racist America.

In a reasonable world, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi declaring that the “face of the future of our country” shall have “brown skin and brown eyes,” or the fact Keith Ellison is deputy chairman of the Democratic National Committee — despite his support for left-wing extremists, and his black nationalist and Islamist connections — would be proof enough that racial politics are acceptable when the peddler and the audience are not white.

But these are not reasonable times.

Read the full article in American Greatness.

Pedro L. Gonzalez

Pedro L. Gonzalez

Pedro is a Mount Vernon Fellow of the Center for American Greatness and the editor of Shield Society.

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The Myth of American Racism
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